Author Topic: lionstracs  (Read 4729 times)

pljones

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lionstracs
« on: March 17, 2012, 04:53:56 PM »
Hi all,

Anyone seen http://www.lionstracs.com/store/index.php gear in use?  Tried it with KAT gear?

Does it compare well with the Receptor?  Are they only really focussed on keyboard sounds?

gmbydmit

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Re: lionstracs
« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2012, 11:58:45 PM »
What's the deal with VST's and Linux?

pljones

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Re: lionstracs
« Reply #2 on: March 18, 2012, 04:41:07 AM »
What's the deal with VST's and Linux?
How'd you mean?  To the best of my knowledge, both Receptor and the lionstracs gear run Linux, run WINE to provide a Windows runtime for plugins that need it and then use wineasio to link this back to the Linux audio system, JACK.  In both cases, this means there are some plugins that won't work - those needing proprietary hardware devices not available on Linux due to lack of vendor support (iLok, etc).  As I understand it, both also support native Linux audio and MIDI plugins.  On top of this "common" (quotes because versions of everything may differ providing a different experience) backbone, both Receptor and lionstracs provide a their own user interface for "wiring up" your virtual studio - this is where most of the differences will start appearing, of course.  It's because of the overall similarities that I was asking if anyone had compared them.

I just read a bit more about the lionstracs rack and it looks pretty flexible.  You should be able to load it with anything, pretty much.

gmbydmit

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Re: lionstracs
« Reply #3 on: March 18, 2012, 11:28:25 AM »
What's the deal with VST's and Linux?
How'd you mean?  To the best of my knowledge, both Receptor and the lionstracs gear run Linux, run WINE to provide a Windows runtime for plugins that need it and then use wineasio to link this back to the Linux audio system, JACK.  In both cases, this means there are some plugins that won't work - those needing proprietary hardware devices not available on Linux due to lack of vendor support (iLok, etc).  As I understand it, both also support native Linux audio and MIDI plugins.  On top of this "common" (quotes because versions of everything may differ providing a different experience) backbone, both Receptor and lionstracs provide a their own user interface for "wiring up" your virtual studio - this is where most of the differences will start appearing, of course.  It's because of the overall similarities that I was asking if anyone had compared them.

I just read a bit more about the lionstracs rack and it looks pretty flexible.  You should be able to load it with anything, pretty much.

You're way over my head with your knowledge in this area....what I meant was, why Linux over Windows or snow leopard or whatever...?

For some reason Windows systems for running vst's won't work??
 
like the "Freddy" ....   Basic rack mount PC running Studio One (Presonus) ... It fizzled ?

One other question.......on the link for Lionstracs.....was that 1560 euros?

How many US dollars?




pljones

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Re: lionstracs
« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2012, 03:34:44 PM »
Windows costs money (especially Server Edition, likely to be needed if you want to run without a standard display/keyboard/mouse set up).  MacOS costs money and only runs on Apple's kit.  Linux is free and runs on pretty much anything. See [1], [2] as well as your usual desktop PC.

If Windows goes wrong, you need Microsoft to fix it.  If they decide to.  And it could take a while...
If MacOS goes wrong, Apple will blame you as they know it works on their kit.
If Linux goes wrong, you have the source code and can start to fix it yourself immediately.

If you need a new feature in the Windows OS, you need Microsoft to add it.  See above.
etc...

People building custom hardware need an OS that lets them do what they want to do.  Linux is there.  The support is there.

Windows is designed as a general purpose OS primarily for two environments: standard desktop and standard server.  It's not easy to customise.  When you do, you'll find the weak points.  If it breaks, you have the pieces to look at...

Currency converter: xe.com.  I usually work on a rough 1:1 for €:$ and 1.4:1 for €/$:£.  But I've not checked recently.  Remember outside the EU, you won't be paying the 20% sales tax, if that's displayed as included.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2012, 03:47:06 PM by pljones »